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The Death Penalty

Do you agree with the Death Penalty?  

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Saudi Arabia executed 81 people Saturday convicted of crimes ranging from killings to belonging to militant groups, the largest known mass execution carried out in the kingdom in its modern history.

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I was wondering if there is a list anywhere of living people who have had a death sentence commuted in the UK?  

 

I was reading about Liam Holden, still only 68, who was sentenced to death in 1973 (Northern Ireland abolished the death penalty shortly afterwards).

 

Jersey and the Isle of Man were still giving out death sentences  in the 1980s and there must be a few survivors of the 'pause' on executions in the 1960s from the UK mainland, but a definitive list isn't readily available so far as I can see, let alone who might still be alive.

 

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1 hour ago, DevonDeathTrip said:

I was wondering if there is a list anywhere of living people who have had a death sentence commuted in the UK?  

 

I was reading about Liam Holden, still only 68, who was sentenced to death in 1973 (Northern Ireland abolished the death penalty shortly afterwards).

 

Jersey and the Isle of Man were still giving out death sentences  in the 1980s and there must be a few survivors of the 'pause' on executions in the 1960s from the UK mainland, but a definitive list isn't readily available so far as I can see, let alone who might still be alive.

 

Tony Teare was the last person on Isle of Man to be given the death sentence and that was in 1992. He would only be in his 50s now so possibly still alive.

Other people given death sentence on IOM since it was abolished in UK are

James Lunney in 1973 aged 21

Graham Frankland in 1980 aged 27/28

Michael Pate in 1981 aged 21

Stephen Moore in 1982 aged 18

 

I think that's it. All of them could potentially still be living.

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On 21/08/2022 at 11:22, DevonDeathTrip said:

I was wondering if there is a list anywhere of living people who have had a death sentence commuted in the UK?  

 

I was reading about Liam Holden, still only 68, who was sentenced to death in 1973 (Northern Ireland abolished the death penalty shortly afterwards).

 

Jersey and the Isle of Man were still giving out death sentences  in the 1980s and there must be a few survivors of the 'pause' on executions in the 1960s from the UK mainland, but a definitive list isn't readily available so far as I can see, let alone who might still be alive.

 

Liam Holden dead at only 68.

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3 hours ago, Summer in Transylvania said:

The first openly transgender Death Row inmate in the USA is to be executed today.

 

The person in question is Amber McLoughlin of Missouri, perpetrator of the 2003 stabbing of her ex-girlfriend Beverly Guenther.

*his

 

I don't respect the pronouns of murderers.

Edited by When The
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31 minutes ago, When The said:

 

That "Amber" man doesn't deserve any respect. He is a murderer and today he will face the consequences


No he isn’t, but she might.

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Ok I fixed the original comment. I don't respect the pronouns of murderers.

 

I'm sorry if the wording sounded hateful. Trans rights are human rights. However, McLaughlin is not a human.

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1 hour ago, When The said:

Ok I fixed the original comment. I don't respect the pronouns of murderers.

 

I'm sorry if the wording sounded hateful. Trans rights are human rights. However, McLaughlin is not a human.

 

 

A little confused.gif

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 They're dead. 

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10 minutes ago, jcc said:
They're dead. 

One less murderer in the world. Good riddance.

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4 hours ago, Sir Creep said:

Missouri carried out the first known US execution of an openly transgender person Tuesday when Amber McLaughlin, who was convicted of a 2003 murder and unsuccessfully sought clemency from the governor, was put to death by lethal injection.

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They want to be treated the same.

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Gerald Pizzuto was scheduled to be executed by lethal injection on December 15, 2022. Now, his scheduled execution date is March 23, 2023.

The Idaho Department of Corrections has continued to delay Pizzuto's execution because they haven't been able to get the chemicals to carry it out.
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The nation’s lowest threshold for issuing the death penalty is now law in Florida.

Thursday morning, Gov. Ron DeSantis delivered on his promise to sign a law no longer requiring unanimous jury consent to access the death penalty.

Now only eight of 12 jurors are needed to recommend capital punishment. Wiping out the previous unanimity requirement.

Judges could still override a jury’s decision but would have to give an explanation as to why in a written order.  
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.wrong thread

 

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I'm against the death penalty. One of the main reasons is the risk of misjudgment. It's terrifying to think that an innocent person could be executed due to errors or biases in the legal system. It's a relief that the legal system includes the possibility of appeals. Because as it's mentioned here, when there are legal errors or new evidence, an appeal can provide a chance to correct a wrongful conviction. The value of human life and the potential for error in judgment make capital punishment a wrong solution, in my view.

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On 30/05/2024 at 04:13, CocoFootballCoco said:

I'm against the death penalty. One of the main reasons is the risk of misjudgment. It's terrifying to think that an innocent person could be executed due to errors or biases in the legal system. 

 

Then you’ve zero knowledge of how the legal system works.  Why not walk us through the process of how your innocent strawman ended up being executed.

You can be against the DP on other grounds (meaning purely moral ones, what other is there?) but not that confounded nonsense of reasoning.

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10 hours ago, Sir Creep said:

 

Then you’ve zero knowledge of how the legal system works.  Why not walk us through the process of how your innocent strawman ended up being executed.

You can be against the DP on other grounds (meaning purely moral ones, what other is there?) but not that confounded nonsense of reasoning.


You are profoundly ignorant. Since the death penalty was reinstated in 1973 the U.S. has executed roughly 200 innocent people. About 4% of people executed are later found to have not committed the crime of which they were convicted.
 

https://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.1306417111

 

As to your request for a narrative explanation: someone (usually a young, poor, poorly educated, Black male) is arrested for committing murder. They’re probably not a saint but they didn’t kill this person. Cops arrest them, knock them around and/or coerce a confession out of them before they call the PDs office. They finally get a PD in there and he’s overworked and exhausted and has no resources so he isn’t able to get whatever judge to throw out the confession. So the jury hears it and convicts. Let’s say all of this happens in Texas where they fast track executions, so, despite having grounds for an appeal and a retrial, he’s executed before somewhere like the Innocence Project is able to take up his case. Later on, someone else gets picked up for something else and in the process of an investigation it turns out they did the first murder the other guy died for. Whoops. 200 times in 50 years. 

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29 minutes ago, arrowsmith said:


You are profoundly ignorant. Since the death penalty was reinstated in 1973 the U.S. has executed roughly 200 innocent people. About 4% of people executed are later found to have not committed the crime of which they were convicted.
 

https://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.1306417111

 

As to your request for a narrative explanation: someone (usually a young, poor, poorly educated, Black male) is arrested for committing murder. They’re probably not a saint but they didn’t kill this person. Cops arrest them, knock them around and/or coerce a confession out of them before they call the PDs office. They finally get a PD in there and he’s overworked and exhausted and has no resources so he isn’t able to get whatever judge to throw out the confession. So the jury hears it and convicts. Let’s say all of this happens in Texas where they fast track executions, so, despite having grounds for an appeal and a retrial, he’s executed before somewhere like the Innocence Project is able to take up his case. Later on, someone else gets picked up for something else and in the process of an investigation it turns out they did the first murder the other guy died for. Whoops. 200 times in 50 years. 

That's an argument for much more careful dispensation of the death penalty, no doubt about it.  The utmost and extreme standards of proof even. But there's no reason to keep living someone like say, Ted Bundy, or John Wayne Gacy.

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