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Grim Reaper

Dead
Peter O'sullevan

85 posts in this topic

His staying power always did defy the odds. I reckon he's something of a long shot at a mere 87, especially since he looked fairly alert and fit on Sports Personality of the Year in December 2004.

 

The final furlong may be a year or two away, or did some tipster slip the nominations board a bit of inside information?

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Re Josco's handle: Oscar was of Anglo-Irish descent and was NEVER British plus he went, not the wallpaper. Harumph.

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Re Josco's handle: Oscar was of Anglo-Irish descent and was NEVER British plus he went, not the wallpaper. Harumph.

His mother would probably agree with you, but that nasty old Act of Union of 1801, makes Josco's description of 'British' correct.... I think?

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(Slave to the Grave) His mother would probably agree with you, but that nasty old Act of Union of 1801, makes Josco's description of 'British' correct.... I think?

 

Probably one for the lawyers! :(

 

According to Wikipedia, the term "British" can be used to indicate association with ....the British Isles - which include the whole of the island of Ireland.

 

I would, personally, be rather cautious in describing a native of Dublin (of Irish parents and educated in Enniskillen and Dublin) as British, but it seems that the word "British" can, nevertheless, be applied to Oscar Wilde.

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I would, personally, be rather cautious in describing a native of Dublin (of Irish parents and educated in Enniskillen and Dublin) as British, but it seems that the word "British" can, nevertheless, be applied to Oscar Wilde.

As with a section of the population of Northern Ireland today, and indeed Wales, and Scotland (and a few other places too), I'm sure that not all the residents of Dublin at the time of Oscar Wilde's birth were 'proud to be British'. But at that time, technically they were British. (The Act of Union 1801, introduced the red diagonal cross of St. Patrick into the Union Flag).

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I would, personally, be rather cautious in describing a native of Dublin (of Irish parents and educated in Enniskillen and Dublin) as British, but it seems that the word "British" can, nevertheless, be applied to Oscar Wilde.

As with a section of the population of Northern Ireland today, and indeed Wales, and Scotland (and a few other places too), I'm sure that not all the residents of Dublin at the time of Oscar Wilde's birth were 'proud to be British'. But at that time, technically they were British. (The Act of Union 1801, introduced the red diagonal cross of St. Patrick into the Union Flag).

The historical facts are indisputable. The British government could claim allegiance from inhabitants of Ireland.

 

On 1st Jan 1801, the Kingdom of Britain was merged with the Kingdom of Ireland to become the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (further modified in 1927 to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland).

 

So even in 1801 the name of Ireland was retained in the name of the new nation, enabling the islanders to claim to be "Irish" or "British". In a purely geographical sense, they still have that choice today.

 

Perhaps Mr Josco has some inside information about Mr Wilde's preference in this matter? (It does seem likely that OW's mother would have chosen "Irish".)

 

BTW -

Haven't I seen a red diagonal cross somewhere on this forum ???? :(

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Captain Oates, I take your point regarding choice.

 

I personally like to think of Mr Wilde as a man of the world. Afterall he did choose to spend the last years of his life in France, and is buried here. So I will think of him as a little bit French. What bit exactly, I'm not sure.

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Oscar Wilde was a British as the Duke of Wellington (he he)

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The Duke of Wellington was born in 1769 in the Kingdom of Ireland.

 

Before 1801 Ireland was a separate state, ruled by England and latterly Great Britain.

 

So the Duke of Wellington was more Irish than Oscar Wilde.

 

(But less popular with some French, probably.)

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Re Josco's handle: Oscar was of Anglo-Irish descent and was NEVER British plus he went, not the wallpaper. Harumph.

His mother would probably agree with you, but that nasty old Act of Union of 1801, makes Josco's description of 'British' correct.... I think?

I never thought that my insouciant little handle would cause so much comment. I shall now spend some of my working hours looking for clarification, and then I shall modify the handle if it is deemed appropriate.

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Oscar Wilde was a British as the Duke of Wellington (he he)

Or maybe the Duke of York. Like Oscar Wilde, he too had 10,000 men!

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Oscar Wilde was a British as the Duke of Wellington (he he)

Or maybe the Duke of York. Like Oscar Wilde, he too had 10,000 men!

Not sure about the Duke of York (Andrew) having 10,000 men, but can't vouch for the Earl of Wessex............

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Getting back to the subject of this thread....*ahem* <_<

 

Mr O'Sullevan was at the Cheltenham Gold Cup back in March doing a book-sign so I would imagine he's in pretty good health. :o

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I dont really think O'Sullevan scores enough on the famous test for

the dl. Even though he may be known in the UK somewhat he isent that famous

in America. ;)

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Don't you think the Deathlist Committee should be the judges of that?

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Don't you think the Deathlist Committee should be the judges of that?

Well yes but are the judges always correct?

 

In the OJ Simpson trial for example Johnnie Cochran represented him as his lawyer trying to not find him guilty of murdering his wife and the individual who brought her watch home from the bar she was at the night before. Cochran did a well enough job to convince the judge and the jury that Simpson was innocent.

But the reality was OJ Simpson got away with murder.

 

 

And also quite a bit of the committe i reckon is british

so O'Sullevan may have more of a name in the uk

then he does here in America. Though if you took just his fame in

the uk that could pass him on the famous test.

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Well I hate to speculate ;) but I suspect the Deathlist Selection Committee might have come to a different verdict on Mr. Simpson, had they been the jury.

 

But it's part of Deathlist's nature to have slightly obscure British people on it.

 

Isn't there an American list somewhere where those who feel the need can discuss/observe/watch/make illiterate posts about, etc, Lady bird Johnson and ageing US baseball players and soap "stars" from the 50's to their hearts' content?

 

If there isn't, there ought to be.

 

Perhaps on that list SPELLING and GRAMMAR could be optional? :D

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Perhaps on that list SPELLING and GRAMMAR could be optional?   :D

Allright allright my typing skills arent as good

as yours nottoptAtto but iam sure what i type is somewhat

understandable. ;)

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So am I to understand that whenever you write something by hand, as opposed to typing, it is literate, articulate and correctly punctuated?

 

I'm afraid everything I write whether by hand or at the keyboard is the same incomprehensible ill-informed drivel.

 

I mean well though.

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Allright allright my typing skills arent as good

as yours nottoptAtto but iam sure what i type is somewhat

understandable. :D

nottoptAtto. Fantastic, may I use it in future posts?

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The Duke of  Wellington was born in 1769 in the Kingdom of Ireland

 

Before 1801 Ireland was a separate state, ruled by England and latterly Great Britain. 

 

So the Duke of Wellington was more Irish than Oscar Wilde. 

 

(But less popular with some French, probably.)

When asked about his being born in Ireland, the Duke was said to have retorted: "Just because you were born in a stable doesn't make you a horse"

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