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With respect to the World Series name, remember it's been around for 100 years and back when it started baseball wasn't much played outside the US, so it wasn't such a self-absorbed sounding moniker.

 

 

Anyway, I expect around ten Japanese players to be on the market this winter. All who are overrated, and all who will be overpaid.

 

I'm not sure why you consider all Japanese players to be overrated, BS. Certainly Ichiro Suzuki is worth every penny he's being paid. Another good example is Hideki Okajima who was a wonderful bargain for the Red Sox, without whom I doubt they would be champions this year. Regarding Matsuzaka, it's true that this year he had some struggles, but remember that Josh Beckett, who was nearly untouchable for the Red Sox in this year's playoffs, was mediocre last year with a high ERA and giving up around 35 home runs. His adjustment to the American League (learning he can't just use his fastball) made him the best pitcher in the majors. Matsuzaka has good "stuff" but has to learn not to nibble so much and throw more strikes. When he does, he will be worth all the money Boston's paying him.

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I'm not sure why you consider all Japanese players to be overrated, BS. Certainly Ichiro Suzuki is worth every penny he's being paid.

 

I hands down agree with you on that. I think Ichiro is one of the greatest contact hitters in the game, not to mention one of the greatest hitters ever. I think if he would have played the first decade of his career at the major league level he would be on legendary ground, even at chance to achieve the title of most hits ever.

 

My point is a majority of Japanese players don't live up to their contracts, and I could name more examples backing that up then I can name players who have been better then what they have demonstrated in Japan.

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Bearing in mind that the national sport of Finland is a variant of baseball, have any Finnish players made it to the MLB ranks?

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Bearing in mind that the national sport of Finland is a variant of baseball, have any Finnish players made it to the MLB ranks?

 

This is the only one I can find: http://www.baseball-almanac.com/players/pl...php?p=michajo01

 

There used to be some but they're all Finnished.

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Barry Bonds indicted on perjury charges

 

SAN FRANCISCO, California (CNN) -- A federal grand jury indictment on Thursday charged Barry Bonds, baseball's record home run hitter, with perjury and obstruction of justice and accused him of testing positive for performance-enhancing steroids.

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Barry Bonds should not be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Hall of Shame would be more like it.

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Guest The Clear and the Cream
Not much room left in that Hall of Shame now, especially with that fat bastard Clemens there. How long till the NFL, NHL and NBA drugs investigations, or is everyone squeaky clean in those sports?

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Things are rapidly changing in the MLB and the era of 60+ home run hitters who have been completely dominating the game since the 'mid nineties' have now had their steroid obtaining checks turned in. Overall this restores the game back to it's original self and it has placed careers and statistics in a all - time jeopardy. I think the year 2007 was a year of retaining youth and a year of dramatic decrease in steroid use.

 

The NFL is one of the most drug enhanced games on the face of the earth. The NHL, NBA, and I'm sure many 'soccer' players are definitely on some Deca-Durabolin and in my view it's only a matter of time before this steroid extermination hits every sport.

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Not much room left in that Hall of Shame now, especially with that fat bastard Clemens there. How long till the NFL, NHL and NBA drugs investigations, or is everyone squeaky clean in those sports?

 

I can't say I was sorry or surprised to hear Clemens' name. The NFL has been testing for years but some things like Human Growth Hormone aren't detectable. I guess it just remains to be seen, for all sports all over the world Creamy.

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Speaking of pitchers, it is with some moderate sense of sadness that I must inform all of you of the passing of legendary Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher (later the Lose Angeles Dodgers) Johnny Podres has died at the tender age of 75.

 

Podres Obit

 

Johnny Podres stood on top of the world

 

GLENS FALLS — There are so few of us who ever get to dance with the gods — even just for a few minutes — but Johnny Podres was that exception.

 

Podres, who died Sunday evening at Glens Falls Hospital, delivered "next year" for long-suffering Brooklyn Dodgers fans when he shut out the mighty New York Yankees in a historic Game 7 in 1955.

 

At the age of 23, his place in history was secure.

 

He won two World Series games that year and was named Sports Illustrated’s first-ever Sportsman of the Year. His Game 7 victory was worthy of five minutes of commentary on Ken Burns’ acclaimed documentary, "Baseball."

 

Although he would play 15 years in the big leagues and win 148 games, it never would get any better than that October day in the Bronx when Podres stood on top of the world.

 

Not bad for small-time boy from Witherbee who made it out of the mines and all the way to a five-decade career in Major League Baseball before retiring in Queensbury.

 

"He said, ‘I would not change one moment of my life,’ " said his wife of 41 years, Joan Podres. "He was a gem out of Mineville."

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Speaking of pitchers, it is with some moderate sense of sadness that I must inform all of you of the passing of legendary Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher (later the Lose Angeles Dodgers) Johnny Podres has died at the tender age of 75.

 

Podres Obit

 

Johnny Podres stood on top of the world

 

GLENS FALLS — There are so few of us who ever get to dance with the gods — even just for a few minutes — but Johnny Podres was that exception.

 

Podres, who died Sunday evening at Glens Falls Hospital, delivered "next year" for long-suffering Brooklyn Dodgers fans when he shut out the mighty New York Yankees in a historic Game 7 in 1955.

 

At the age of 23, his place in history was secure.

 

He won two World Series games that year and was named Sports Illustrated’s first-ever Sportsman of the Year. His Game 7 victory was worthy of five minutes of commentary on Ken Burns’ acclaimed documentary, "Baseball."

 

Although he would play 15 years in the big leagues and win 148 games, it never would get any better than that October day in the Bronx when Podres stood on top of the world.

 

Not bad for small-time boy from Witherbee who made it out of the mines and all the way to a five-decade career in Major League Baseball before retiring in Queensbury.

 

"He said, ‘I would not change one moment of my life,’ " said his wife of 41 years, Joan Podres. "He was a gem out of Mineville."

 

Good guy too, met him when he was coaching the Phillies...1955 Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year :ghost:

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Heeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee's out!

 

In other news former sux catcer John Marzano has gone up to bat one last time:

From MLB.com we have this:

 

John Marzano enjoyed a rich and wonderful baseball life, from hometown college star and Olympian to Major Leaguer for more than a decade to analyst of the game he loved.

On Saturday, that rich and wonderful baseball life came to a tragic and untimely end.

 

Marzano, a former Major League catcher who most recently served as an engaging host of the "Leading Off" show on MLB.com, died at his home in South Philadelphia, apparently after taking a fall down a flight of stairs and possibly after suffering a heart attack. He was 45.

 

Marzano, a first-round draft pick of the Red Sox in 1984 who played for the Sox, Rangers and Mariners, was in his second season as an on-air personality at MLB.com.

 

 

As the bio of Marzano on the "Leading Off" blog said: "He is Rocky, Vince Papale, Mike Schmidt and the Liberty Bell all wrapped into one!"

 

Micucci wrote of his close relationship with Marzano in a post on the "Leading Off" blog on Saturday.

 

"John took me under his wing and treated me as if I were his own son," Micucci wrote. "He always spoke fondly of his former teammates, his loving family and his love of baseball. He repeatedly used to tell me that his father's best advice to him was: 'It is nice to be important but it is more important to be nice.' He lived every day that way and I will take it with me forever. I love him like family."

 

Marzano is survived by his wife Terri, daughters Dominique and Danielle, and two grandchildren

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Former major league pitcher Geremi Gonzalez who played for the Boston Red Sox and New York Mets, has died after he was struck by lightning in his native Venezuela.

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Just heard that last week the oldest living former Major League Baseball player, Bill Werber, turned 100 years old. Not that remarkable, until one learns he is the only ex-teammate of Babe Ruth still alive. When asked if he spent much time out on the town with the notoriously boozy Babe, Werber answered, "Hell no, how do you think I lived to be 100?"

 

Werber's Original

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The Home Run Derby airs Monday night at Yankee Stadium in it's final year.

 

These are the contestants. One has not been announced yet. It's a talented group and I'm going to try and successfully predict this years winner after being way off last year. I think Berkman is definitely a possibility but I'll go with Josh Hamilton who has been an unbelievable story. The Vasquez-Hamilton trade this off season had to be in the (top 5) trades of the decade.

 

Lance Berkman - 22

Ryan Braun - 22

Josh Hamilton - 20

Evan Longoria - 16

Grady Sizemore - 22

Dan Uggla - 23

Chase Utley - 25

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The Home Run Derby airs Monday night at Yankee Stadium in it's final year.

 

These are the contestants. One has not been announced yet. It's a talented group and I'm going to try and successfully predict this years winner after being way off last year. I think Berkman is definitely a possibility but I'll go with Josh Hamilton who has been an unbelievable story. The Vasquez-Hamilton trade this off season had to be in the (top 5) trades of the decade.

 

Lance Berkman - 22

Ryan Braun - 22

Josh Hamilton - 20

Evan Longoria - 16

Grady Sizemore - 22

Dan Uggla - 23

Chase Utley - 25

And in a related story, former Yankee Bobby Murcer is now dead for a few days. The timing of his death couldm't have come at a worse or better time as it was just days before the final All-Star Game would be played at the current Yankee Stadium (the new abode is being constructed and scheduled for opening next year).\\Now back to Murcer::

 

 

Bobby Murcer, a five-time All-Star outfielder who spent nearly four decades with the New York Yankees as a player, executive and announcer, has died. He was 62.

 

The Yankees said Murcer died Saturday due to complications from a malignant brain tumor. He was surrounded by family at Mercy Hospital in his hometown of Oklahoma City, the team said.

 

Murcer was diagnosed with a brain tumor Dec. 24, 2006, and had surgery that week in Houston. He returned to the broadcast booth last year and briefly this season.

 

Murcer hit .277 with 252 home runs and 1,043 RBIs in 17 seasons. The Yankees traded him to the Giants in October 1974 for Bobby Bonds. The Giants sent him to the Chicago Cubs in February 1977. The Cubs dealt him back to the Yankees in June 1979.

 

Mercer made the All-Star team in both leagues and won a Gold Glove.

 

"He was a tough man," Yankees Manager Joe Girardi said. "He was a great Yankee, but probably more importantly he was a great friend. He always put others first. He played the game the right way. He got what life was about, and that was making life better for the people around you."

 

Yankees closer Mariano Rivera said: "He touched everybody."

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Yankees closer Mariano Rivera said: "He touched everybody."

 

Dirty pervert.

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Next year indeed. The Mets choke even worse than the glorious Brewers (AKA the Tinies), who make the playoffs for the first time in 26 years. :)

Now, if only 10CC Sabathia can pitch every single inning of every single playoff game... :ph34r:

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Doc Ellis, former Pirate, former Yankee, former Met, is dead!

 

 

From Pittsburgh Tribune-Review we have this:::::

Dock Ellis, a right-handed pitcher who won 96 games for the Pirates from 1968-75, died of apparent liver disease on Friday at the USC Medical Center in Los Angeles, according to wife, Hjordis. He was 63.

 

Ellis claimed in his autobiography, "Dock Ellis in the Country of Baseball," that he was under the influence of the illegal hallucinogen LSD in 1970 when he threw a rare Pirates' no-hitter in a 2-0 victory over the San Diego Padres.

 

Ellis performed in the era before baseball drug testing.

 

"Ellis, who conducted the normal postgame interviews following the no-hitter, waited until his retirement to make his LSD claim.

 

Ellis, a 6-foot-3 right-handed power pitcher, went 138-119 and posted a 3.46 ERA during a 12-year career.

 

"He had good stuff, that's all I know," Tanner said. "He had good control of his fastball."

 

Ellis finished 19-9 in 1971, when the Pirates won the World Series. However, Ellis lost the opening game of the series to Baltimore Orioles ace Dave McNally.

 

Ellis pitched on four Pirates' NL East winners and started Opening Day three times (1971, '72 and '75).

 

In his only career All-Star Game appearance, in 1971, Ellis gave up a towering home run to Reggie Jackson off the light standard at Detroit's Tiger Stadium.

 

Always capable of the unexpected — or outrageous — Ellis opened a game against Cincinnati in May 1974 by drilling Pete Rose in the ribs, Joe Morgan in the side and Dan Driessen in the back. After walking Tony Perez, Ellis delivered two consecutive pitches near Johnny Bench's head. Pirates manager Danny Murtaugh finally yanked Ellis out of the game.

 

In May 1972, Ellis was maced by a security guard at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati in a dispute that was settled out of court.

In August 1973, Ellis was ordered by Pirates officials to stop wearing hair curlers to the ballpark. Ellis began wearing curlers following an Ebony magazine article, he said.

 

Ellis was 96-80 with the Pirates in the first half of his career, before joining the New York Yankees (18-9), Oakland (1-5), Texas (20-21) and the New York Mets (3-7).

 

The Pirates traded Ellis following the 1975 season to the Yankees for Doc Medich. Ellis went 17-8 in 1976 for the Yankees and won a start in the AL Championship Series against Kansas City.

 

Ellis, who was suffering from cirrhosis of the liver, was on a transplant list when he died, according to ESPN.com.

 

Ellis served as a drug and alcohol abuse counselor and spokesman to baseball players and organizations during the past two decades, including the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections and the Black Athletes Foundation for Sickle Cell Research.

 

"It's a tremendous loss to the family," Hjordis Ellis said.

He wil be missed.

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He had the distinction of having played under seven different managers in one season:

 

Ellis opened the 1977 season with the Yankees, under manager Billy Martin. He made three starts for them, and then, on April 27, he was traded along with Minor Leaguers Marty Perez and Larry Murray to the Athletics for Mike Torrez. By the way, Yankees owner George Steinbrenner was willing to trade Ron Guidry along with Ellis, but general manager Gabe Paul intervened.

 

Ellis spent about six weeks with the Athletics and went 1-5 with a 9.69 ERA. While he was in Oakland, Athletics owner Charlie Finley fired manager Jack McKeon on June 9 and replaced him with Bobby Winkles.

 

Ellis was with the Athletics for about a week under Winkles before he was sold to the Rangers on June 15, which was the Trade Deadline in those days. When Ellis arrived in Texas, the Rangers were managed by Lucchesi.

 

But Lucchesi lasted just one more week on the job after Ellis arrived. He was fired and replaced by Eddie Stanky, who led the Rangers to a 10-8 victory over the Twins on June 22.

 

The next morning, Stanky quit. The Rangers had hired him from the University of South Alabama, and he was homesick after just one game. He only managed that one game before going back to Alabama.

 

The Rangers replaced him with interim manager Connie Ryan, who didn't want the job on a full-time basis. So the Rangers hired Orioles coach Billy Hunter on June 28. He was their fourth manager that season.

 

And he was No. 7 for Ellis.

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He's like a post-hype prospect in Baseball. By the way, Go Phillies.

f**k the Phillies. If you feel inclined to be a front runner just become a Yankee fan because they have finally developed some young talent who have potential. They also just bought three top players who's salaries are worth 293 million combined.

 

Although I'm a Jamie Moyer fan because he is 46, a location arm, and he just signed a two year deal which is ridiculous. He made his debut in 1986. Anyway, this is off topic but it's just conversation in the meantime until somebody drops dead. I'm going out and it's time to open up some more champaign.

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He's like a post-hype prospect in Baseball. By the way, Go Phillies.

f**k the Phillies. If you feel inclined to be a front runner just become a Yankee fan because they have finally developed some young talent who have potential. They also just bought three top players who's salaries are worth 293 million combined.

 

Although I'm a Jamie Moyer fan because he is 46, a location arm, and he just signed a two year deal which is ridiculous. He made his debut in 1986. Anyway, this is off topic but it's just conversation in the meantime until somebody drops dead. I'm going out and it's time to open up some more champaign.

 

You are such a d*ck. I'm from Philly. The Yankees and Mets can try to buy it every year, and they keep losing. I hate you and I hate the Mets. Eat Sh*t!! Happy New Year.

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