Jump to content
CarolAnn

Baseball

Recommended Posts

No runs, no hits, no Aaron.
Aaron Cox, the 24-year-old brother-in-law of Angels star Mike Trout and until recently a pitching prospect in the team’s minor league system, died Wednesday, the Angels announced. A cause of death was not given.

SC

(Edit:  Tough crowd...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, alt obits guy said:

Joe Landrum, a former Major League pitcher and the father of a former Big Leaguer, has died.  He was 89.   Landrum played 16 games for the Brooklyn Dodgers over two years in the early 1950s.

 

https://www.fresnobee.com/sports/article217049975.html

 

 


16 total games, but was actually had a baseball card made in two different seasons.  Not bad.

14080.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Horace "Doc" Edwards died in San Antonio, Texas. He was 81.

He was a backup catcher for most his major league playing career. 

Born in Red Jacket, W.Va. in 1936, Edwards earned his nickname after service time as a medic in the Navy. He played in 317 games in the major leagues from 1962-70 with a. 238 batting average 15 home runs and 87 RBIs for Cleveland, Kansas City, Philadelphia and New York Yankees.  Edwards managed the Cleveland Indians from 1987 to '89 and compiled a record of 173-207 in three years, including the strike-shortened 1987 season.  He would later managed the minor league Buffalo Bisons for two seasons (1993-94).

Interestingly, despite playing in 300 more games than Joe Landrum (above), I can not find a baseball card for him as a player.  Hmmm.
SC

 

11064.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Former major league pitcher Lee Stange, who won a career-high 12 games for the Twins in 1963, died Friday. He was 81.
Stange pitched for the Twins from 1961-64, Cleveland from 1964-66, Boston from 1966-70 and the Chicago White Sox in 1970. He was traded from the Twins to the Indians in a deal where the Twins got future 20-game winner Jim “Mudcat” Grant.
Stange was later a Red Sox pitching coach and was with the Boston organization for 23 years. He was 8-10 for the 1967 “Impossible Dream” Red Sox. His career record was 62-61 with 21 saves and a 3.56 ERA.
SC


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marty Pattin, who won over 100 games in his career and pitched in the 1971 all-star game, has died.  He was 75.  Pattin was on the 1969 Seattle Pilots for their lone major league season but spent the bulk of his career with Kansas City. 

 

https://www.kansascity.com/sports/mlb/kansas-city-royals/article219466410.html

Image result for Marty Pattin baseball card

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, alt obits guy said:

Marty Pattin, who won over 100 games in his career and pitched in the 1971 all-star game, has died.  He was 75.  Pattin was on the 1969 Seattle Pilots for their lone major league season but spent the bulk of his career with Kansas City. 

 

https://www.kansascity.com/sports/mlb/kansas-city-royals/article219466410.html

 


Can't be many Seattle Pilots left.
I was but 7 years old but I attended the 1971 All Star Game in Detroit.  So I guess I saw Pattin play in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wayne Krenchicki, a backup infielder for several teams from 1979 to 1986, minor league coach and University of Miami Hall of Fame member, has died.  He was 64.

 

 

https://www.cincinnati.com/story/sports/mlb/reds/2018/10/17/wayne-krenchicki-ex-reds-infielder-minor-league-manager-dies-64/1667749002/

 

http://www.umsportshalloffame.com/wayne-krenchicki.html

 

Image result for Wayne Krenchicki

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boston Red Sox World Series champs!!!!!

 

Between that and my first moose, October was pretty good in New England!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Ulitzer95 said:

Former Pirates / Braves player Dick Cole has died at 92 according to this tweet.

Posted 4 days ago but no confirmation yet.

Same name as the last of the Doolittle Raiders.....is there kismet and happenstance about to kick in??
 

51nq2DZcxkL._SY445_.jpg

ColCole002_PageImg_2017.png__320x476_q85_subsampling-2.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bill Fischer’s life in professional baseball spanned 71 years and included time with two big-league franchises in Kansas City, a major-league record and a World Series ring.

Fischer, who died Tuesday at the age of 88, was the Royals’ pitching coordinator from 2007-10, then became the team’s senior pitching advisor, a job he held for the previous eight seasons.
Fischer was 17 years old when he signed with the Chicago White Sox in 1948, just two weeks after graduating from high school in Wisconsin.

He pitched for the White Sox minor-league system in 1954 and made his major-league debut two years later.  After pitching parts of three seasons with the White Sox, Fischer bounced between the Tigers and Washington Nationals, who would later move to Minnesota.  
In 1961, Fischer joined the Kansas City A’s. A year later, he set a major-league record by pitching 84 1/3 consecutive innings without issuing a walk, breaking the mark of 68 set by Christy Mathewson.
SC

bill_fischer_autograph.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn great ballplayer, Mr. McCovey was.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

Your use of this forum is subject to our Terms of Use