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Tempus Fugit

Renowned Mountaineers, Feeling Peaky?

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Am I the only person to notice that BS is calling Monoclinic a bitch? Maybe I am overreacting, but that's uncalled for and unacceptable BS, do it again and you get a warning. If I have read this out of context, please feel free to correct me.

 

I didn't mean it in the tone your perceiving. I was drinking a little bit last night and I think that you can tell by the out of bounds posts that were recently laid out. I hope Monoclinic wasn't offended by this because I had no intentions of insulting or putting anyone down.

 

I entered my own world of ebonic language. I mean for example' people of all cultures may refer to each other as 'bitch' or 'N-word' and personally I don't use these words often because they can be very harmful to certain individuals especially if they are very sensitive. It's also not really my style.

 

I meant it in a correctional tone, with the touch of ebonic flavor. I hate the fact that you've actually brought this into direct attention because I was hoping it could just slide since in dead on honestly the last thing I want is a feud or a misunderstanding under terms that I'm not comfortable with. So if Monoclinic was seriously offended by this, oh well. You gonna bring me down to chinatown?

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This is the deathlist at its worst. Here's a bloke living life to the full, gets knocked in to the sea by a wave. It was bad luck. All this stuff about irresponsibility etc is bollocks and sour grapes because none of you had him in your dead pools. Neither did I, but the point I'm making is that we need people like Reardon. We have to track them. I would keep an eye on Lewis Pugh, the man who swam at the North Pole. He'll push himself just too far one day.

 

 

Good point Godot; I've been saying summat similar with regard to Hilary Lister and other quadraplegic sailors. Totally applaud what they're up to but pushing limits means starting at the limit and - like - pushing, the safety elements in these cases are being developed the hard way. There will be deaths on the way to establishing what they do as a normal part of sport. So - I guess - in twenty years time another free solo climber will get knocked off by a wave and his ultra-light airbag suit complete with satellite tracking device the size of a pea will lead to instant rescue.

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This is the deathlist at its worst. Here's a bloke living life to the full, gets knocked in to the sea by a wave. It was bad luck. All this stuff about irresponsibility etc is bollocks and sour grapes because none of you had him in your dead pools. Neither did I, but the point I'm making is that we need people like Reardon. We have to track them. I would keep an eye on Lewis Pugh, the man who swam at the North Pole. He'll push himself just too far one day.

 

I'm sorry Godot. I can understand from a score points point of view where you are coming from, however I still think he was a selfish irresponsible git. (I'm too new around here to have many deathpools (just one and its about celebrities here in Belgianland) let alone lists of people who I'd potentially choose so I'm not gutted)

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This is the deathlist at its worst. Here's a bloke living life to the full, gets knocked in to the sea by a wave. It was bad luck. All this stuff about irresponsibility etc is bollocks and sour grapes because none of you had him in your dead pools. Neither did I, but the point I'm making is that we need people like Reardon. We have to track them. I would keep an eye on Lewis Pugh, the man who swam at the North Pole. He'll push himself just too far one day.

 

Here are a few names, for those feeling adventurous. Better get in quick though, as three of them are dead already.

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Where is your helmet Mr? Do you have children too?

 

Considering he is ever so firmly strapped onto a piece of Elastic that is considerably thicker than your brain (difficult to believe I know) the wearing of a helmet is not quite the necessity that it normally would be.

I cant believe that anybody on here would be suffering from the "sour grapes" syndrome.

Anybody that takes it that seriously needs help.

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Oh he is in the hands of god.

 

And you know I'm not the person who needs help, the guy without a helmet falling a hundred f*****g feet backward needs help. I think these people are all insane.

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So selfish. Isn't he? His brothers are waving goodbye.

 

hayden.jpg

 

 

No, no you've got it wrong. It's from the extreme farting world championships, the guy in the air started on the valley floor, the others are there to catch him.

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In what way is 'Swimming in a bikini' a stunt? Admittedly, I couldn't imagine Lee Majors pulling it off convincingly, but there's many that could.

the Lipstick Blondes — who carried out stunts such as swimming in bikinis and crocheting while on Mount Mustagata."

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I've climbed Mont Blanc and in reasonable weather you would travel pretty light, though with proper boots/crampons/rope/ice axe/helmet etc. But I wouldn't have done it without a guide and a detailed weather forecast.

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Have just finished reading Edmund Hillary's account of the Everest victory - "High Adventure". And thoroughly enjoyed it, but then again, this is my sort of subject - South Pole Disaters, Mountaineering Maybe's (Mallory and Irvine) - pushing yourself to the limit stuff, but to the less convicted reader, it is a bit "Got up, had breakfast, climbed a bit, got cold, had lunch, snowed a bit, went to bed, got up, had breakfast . . ."

 

Anyway, written in '55 (I think) so a pretty good account I would suggest.

 

DWB :blink:

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Have just finished reading Edmund Hillary's account of the Everest victory - "High Adventure". And thoroughly enjoyed it, but then again, this is my sort of subject - South Pole Disaters, Mountaineering Maybe's (Mallory and Irvine) - pushing yourself to the limit stuff, but to the less convicted reader, it is a bit "Got up, had breakfast, climbed a bit, got cold, had lunch, snowed a bit, went to bed, got up, had breakfast . . ."

 

Anyway, written in '55 (I think) so a pretty good account I would suggest.

 

DWB :blink:

If you like old mountaineering books I can thoroughly recommend Annapurna by Maurice Herzog, about his climb in 1950. I hadn't realised he was born in 1919. He's one to watch, definite obit.

 

On the way down he got severe frostbite that led to the loss of his toes. He would have lost his feet had maggots not eaten away the dead flesh. When they unwrapped his bandages they shook hundreds of maggots out of his feet.

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Have just finished reading Edmund Hillary's account of the Everest victory - "High Adventure". And thoroughly enjoyed it, but then again, this is my sort of subject - South Pole Disaters, Mountaineering Maybe's (Mallory and Irvine) - pushing yourself to the limit stuff, but to the less convicted reader, it is a bit "Got up, had breakfast, climbed a bit, got cold, had lunch, snowed a bit, went to bed, got up, had breakfast . . ."

 

Anyway, written in '55 (I think) so a pretty good account I would suggest.

 

DWB :)

 

Speaking of which... Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Wylie has died aged 86

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Another brutal weekend on the 'world's deadliest mountain', K2.

 

1 in 4 who have summitted haven't made it back down, but the first two that did, Achille Compagnoni and Lino Lacedelli, both appear to be alive in their 90s and 80s respectively.

 

Sounds like a horrible death as well, hanging upside down on ropes in freezing conditions whilst deprived of oxygen. Still, they must have had a hell of view (albeit the wrong way round) as they dangled over the abyss.

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Another brutal weekend on the 'world's deadliest mountain', K2.

 

1 in 4 who have summitted haven't made it back down, but the first two that did, Achille Compagnoni and Lino Lacedelli, both appear to be alive in their 90s and 80s respectively.

 

Wow, a 27% death rate, and 9% for those who climb Everest. That's even worse than space shuttle astronaut, Isle of Man motorcyclist or Shia pilgrimist in terms of deadly occupations. Why would anyone set out to climb a mountain if there was a 27% chance you'd die if you made it to the top? Nutters.

 

May I nominate "any one K2 climber" for DL 2009?

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Another brutal weekend on the 'world's deadliest mountain', K2.

 

1 in 4 who have summitted haven't made it back down, but the first two that did, Achille Compagnoni and Lino Lacedelli, both appear to be alive in their 90s and 80s respectively.

 

This article from 2004 confirms Compagnoni was certainly still alive then:

 

"As part of the 50th anniversary celebrations, Mr Compagnoni returned to Pakistan."

 

And this one confirms the same for Lacedelli

 

I'm sure if they'd popped their crampons since then, we would have have been made aware.

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Rob Gauntlett

 

"The youngest Briton to climb Everest has died in an avalanche while ice-climbing in the French Alps. Rob Gauntlett, who reached the mountain's 8,840m summit in May 2006, just after he turned 19, was killed yesterday, along with a close friend."

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Another brutal weekend on the 'world's deadliest mountain', K2.

 

1 in 4 who have summitted haven't made it back down, but the first two that did, Achille Compagnoni and Lino Lacedelli, both appear to be alive in their 90s and 80s respectively.

 

This article from 2004 confirms Compagnoni was certainly still alive then:

 

"As part of the 50th anniversary celebrations, Mr Compagnoni returned to Pakistan."

 

And this one confirms the same for Lacedelli

 

I'm sure if they'd popped their crampons since then, we would have have been made aware.

With due respect to Vaagheid, here's a UK obit for Compagnoni. Sounds like he was a bit of a naughty boy (Comps, not Veggie).

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Speaking of climbers........did they ever find what was left of that free-climbing funster who fell off a sea cliff in Ireland last year?

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