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Death Anniversary Thread

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Olivier Messiaen stopped composing on this day 25 years ago, aged 83.

 

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Antonio Gramsci consentingly coerced into a coffin today in 1937.

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Francis Bacon stopped painting on this day 25 years ago, aged 82.

 

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...and drinking!

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Wallace Carothers disintegrated on this day 80 years ago, aged 41.

 

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2 hours ago, TheUndertaker1990 said:

Wallace Carothers disintegrated on this day 80 years ago, aged 41.

 

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Wow! In this pictures he looks over 60!

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Zola Taylor stopped singing on this day 10 years ago, aged 69.

 

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Hunky American actor and bodybuilder Steve Reeves died on this day (1st of May)  in 2000.

Born in Glasgow Montana on January 21St 1926 Reeves was best known for his portrayal of strong muscular characters like Hercules and Goliath (Goliath and the barbarians)  

 

He was offered the role of James Bond in Dr No in 1962 but turned it down because he felt didn't pay enough. 

 

By 1960 Steve Reeves was ranked as the number 1 box office draw in 25 countries. 

 

He died of a blood clot after surgery aged 74.

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On this day in 2011 Legendary British Heavyweight boxer Henry Cooper died aged 76 just over a year after the death of his twin brother George Cooper. 

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On the 1st May 1994 Brazilian racing driver Ayrton Senna died in a racing accident during the San Marino Grand Prix aged just 34.

 

Born on the 21st March 1960 Senna had won the Formula One World Championships three times for McLaren and is considered one of the best ever racing driver's in the sport by many. 

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Charles Pitts stopped playing the guitar on this day 5 years ago, aged 65.

 

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"Whispering" Ted Lowe died today in 2011...

 

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On this day May 2nd in 2015 legendary standard bearer of crime fiction Ruth Rendell died in London aged 85 after a stroke. 

 

A prolific best selling author of murder mystery novels and psychological thrillers her name is synomous with the genre. 

 

She also wrote under the pseudonym Barbara Vine. 

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On May 2nd 2010 British actress Lynn Redgrave of the famous Redgrave acting Dynasty died aged 67 from breast cancer. 

Sister of Corin and Vanessa Redgrave and daughter of Michael Redgrave and Rachel Kempson. 

 

Lynn had an illustrious career on stage and screen full of acting nominations and awards. Oscar nominated in 1999 for God's and monsters other notable films include Girl with the green eyes, The Happy Hooker and Georgy Girl. 

Also a TV film version of Whatever happened to baby Jane?

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16 minutes ago, Gooseberry Crumble said:

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On this day May 2nd in 2015 legendary standard bearer of crime fiction Ruth Rendell died in London aged 85 after a stroke. 

 

A prolific best selling author of murder mystery novels and psychological thrillers her name is synomous with the genre. 

 

She also wrote under the pseudonym Barbara Vine. 

I really, really miss her.  I haven't been able to find any other author who comes near her for creating ominous dread with such a light and sure touch.

Her last few novels weren't up to her best, but still better than most of the dross out there.

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Just now, Toast said:

I really, really miss her.  I haven't been able to find any other author who comes near her for creating ominous dread with such a light and sure touch.

Her last few novels weren't up to her best, but still better than most of the dross out there.

She was brilliant. I think she died within a year or less of PD James another brilliant and favourite crime author of mine. 

Ruth didn't do one dimensional culprits. She was incredibly nuanced in her characterisation whilst still creating an effective atmospheric backdrop to the story. 

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While many deaths are sad, one death that happened that day made a lot of people happy...

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6 minutes ago, Gooseberry Crumble said:

She was brilliant. I think she died within a year or less of PD James another brilliant and favourite crime author of mine. 

Ruth didn't do one dimensional culprits. She was incredibly nuanced in her characterisation whilst still creating an effective atmospheric backdrop to the story. 

 

I enjoyed the early PD James novels, but she developed a dreadfully verbose and turgid style and the books became way too long.  And i hate it when the detective's personal life becomes too intrusive.  Ruth Rendell just managed to stay on the right side of that with her Wexford novels, but only just.  There was usually a topical strand in there that saved it.  I much preferred the non Wexford ones though.

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4 minutes ago, Toast said:

 

I enjoyed the early PD James novels, but she developed a dreadfully verbose and turgid style and the books became way too long.  And i hate it when the detective's personal life becomes too intrusive.  Ruth Rendell just managed to stay on the right side of that with her Wexford novels, but only just.  There was usually a topical strand in there that saved it.  I much preferred the non Wexford ones though.

Oh Ruth was definitely overall better than PD James. 

 

I've never read her Barbara Vine work though -Was it any good? 

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You haven't read any of the Barbara Vines?  You lucky, lucky bastard!  They are the best of the lot.

The very last one (The Child's Child) isn't a typical Vine, so I would leave that till last.  A couple of the later ones I found the explanations a bit obvious, but they were still cracking good reads, and the first ten or so are brilliant.

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On this day the 2nd of May in 1964 Nancy Astor the first female to be elected to AND take her seat in the House of Commons as an MP died aged 84. She's often referred to as the first elected female MP but she isn't as an Irish nationalist was the first female elected as an MP but she refused to take her seat in the house of Commons. 

Nancy was an American born English socialite and was an MP from 1919 to 1945.

 

She was seen by some in the suffragette movement fighting for the right for women to vote as being too posh and out of touch with ordinary women. She wasn't really previously involved in this campaign prior to becoming an MP. 

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Just now, Toast said:

You haven't read any of the Barbara Vines?  You lucky, lucky bastard!  They are the best of the lot.

The very last one (The Child's Child) isn't a typical Vine, so I would leave that till last.  A couple of the later ones I found the explanations a bit obvious, but they were still cracking good reads, and the first ten or so are brilliant.

Thank you for the recommendations! When I read the first line of your post I was convinced you were going to tell me not to bother with them as they were rubbish!! 

 

Do you know why she felt the need to create a pseudonym away from her Ruth Rendell identity? 

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I think she intended them to be a bit distinct from her other novels, but they're not really much different from the standalone psychological ones.

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