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Larry Pestilence III

The English Language

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When I pay for something I am usually given a piece of paper confirming what I have bought and how much I have paid for it.

It is called a receipt.

All of a sudden, it seems, "receipt" has become a word for proof that somebody has said something.  I'm seeing this all over the place now.

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8 hours ago, Toast said:

When I pay for something I am usually given a piece of paper confirming what I have bought and how much I have paid for it.

It is called a receipt.

All of a sudden, it seems, "receipt" has become a word for proof that somebody has said something.  I'm seeing this all over the place now.


That’s a new one on me. I don’t like it. It’d only make sense if one asked for a transcript.

 

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5 hours ago, TQR said:


That’s a new one on me. I don’t like it. It’d only make sense if one asked for a transcript.

 

 

It's been extensively used about Tom Bower's book "Revenge" in which various unnamed Palace staff spill the beans* about Meghan and Harry's treatment of their staff.

"He has receipts".

I've seen it elsewhere too, but the context is too trivial for me to go looking for it again.

 

* It's "tea" now, apparently - "spill the tea"

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32 minutes ago, Toast said:

 

It's been extensively used about Tom Bower's book "Revenge" in which various unnamed Palace staff spill the beans* about Meghan and Harry's treatment of their staff.

"He has receipts".

I've seen it elsewhere too, but the context is too trivial for me to go looking for it again.

 

* It's "tea" now, apparently - "spill the tea"

I hadn't heard that before, but strikes me as an updated "spill the beans". There's sources saying it originated in African-American drag culture, and reached mainstream via Ru Paul's Drag Race, where it's not 'tea' but 't', short for truth, and has evolved to, mean gossip. 

 

'Has receipts' I'm OK with as an alternative to 'has evidence' (as in I understand it's meaning but would never seriously use it), for use if something is denied or questioned.

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People, it's "shoo in/shoo-in", not "shoe in/shoe-in".

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46 minutes ago, time said:

People, it's "shoo in/shoo-in", not "shoe in/shoe-in".

It doesn't matter ya miserable old git.:D

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On 14/10/2022 at 14:53, time said:

I hadn't heard that before, but strikes me as an updated "spill the beans". There's sources saying it originated in African-American drag culture, and reached mainstream via Ru Paul's Drag Race, where it's not 'tea' but 't', short for truth, and has evolved to, mean gossip.

 

I don't think "tea" is an improvement at all. 

Spilling the beans suggests the disclosure of multiple items of gossip, each bean a distinct little titbit. :D

Spilling the tea, well, it's all over in one gush. :evil2:

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6 hours ago, time said:

People, it's "shoo in/shoo-in", not "shoe in/shoe-in".

Well this may be SirC learning something new every day, if you are correct.  Giving the benefit to you and accepting your post as correct, ‘shoo’ makes little sense to SirC, whereas ‘shoe’ made sense (and why it was presumed true), like shoe-in such as a salesman getting their shoe in the front door.  Once that happens you’ll likely get the sale. IOW ‘it’s a shoe-in’.  
SC is happy to hear an explanation for shoo-in/shoo in.

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4 hours ago, Sir Creep said:

Well this may be SirC learning something new every day, if you are correct.  Giving the benefit to you and accepting your post as correct, ‘shoo’ makes little sense to SirC, whereas ‘shoe’ made sense (and why it was presumed true), like shoe-in such as a salesman getting their shoe in the front door.  Once that happens you’ll likely get the sale. IOW ‘it’s a shoe-in’.  
SC is happy to hear an explanation for shoo-in/shoo in.

Time is, of course, correct, as a 5 second glance in a dictionary would tell you.

To "shoo" is American slang for fixing a race so a certain horse will win. Therefore, a "shoo-in" is the horse that wins the fixed race, and from that, any certain winner. 

And thus endeth the lesson. 

You're welcome. 

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OED

shoo, v.

1. transitive

a. To scare or drive away (fowls, etc.) by calling out ‘shoo’ or by means of movement or gestures.

b. To drive or urge (a person, animal, etc.) in a desired direction.

 

2. intransitive To cry out ‘shoo’ in order to frighten or drive away fowls, etc.

3. To hasten away, as after being ‘shooed at’

4. transitive With in, to allow a racehorse to win easily. U.S. slang. Cf. shoo-in n.

 

shoo-in, n.

North American.

 1. In Horse Racing, a predetermined or ‘fixed’ race, or the winner of it. Hence loosely, a horse which is a certain winner.

 2. transferred (esp. Politics). A certain or easy winner; a certainty, a ‘walk-over’.

 

 

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