Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Toast

Words We Dislike

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, theoldlady said:

Outsourcing. (Means you are going to lose your job! :burnash:)

..or at best your employer will be transferring his little problem for somebody else to look after.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Realinement is the current buzz word in my job. 

 

Because restructure is far more scary according to bosses and they think we’re daft enough to fall for that crap. No it’s a restructure and some will loose their jobs.

 

Its as if these people think we fell out of the tree and bounced on every branch on the way down. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Romanticisms can be all well and good, but I really find the words ‘babe’ and ‘baby’ so unutterably bilious. Often a nice sentiment, yes, but the noise that collection of letters forms simply gives me the shudders.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Boudicca said:

Yes! I think it's because too many people don't know the difference between lunch and dinner.

 

Can of worms North / South divide etc I was amazed XH2 family would call the midday thing dinner and they really would have gravy on  it and some woman was available to do that. Not just to him but to the elderly inlaws  despite having small pre school children. A roast every day at lunchtime!

 

fuck knows what they had after work. but my XH grandmother would send a plate to husband and his parents every day.

 

And thinking about it it's fucking strange, who want want meat and potatoes and three veg at noon. I know people who work hard outdoors and even they would be 'oh fuck off with it I'll get my own when I'm finished or I'll have real food" no time for lunch fffs.

 

Interesting.

 

But to me it's the same as 'lovely property' no it's  a house or flat.  Infuriating!

 

I don't think it's as simple as North/South, I'm from the North and the midday meal has always been called lunch in my house. For the evening meal it would depend on whether we were having a full-on sit down meal in which case it was dinner or grabbing something quick before going out which would be tea.

 

When I was with my now ex I'd often ask " Are you going to make dinner tonight or shall I do tea?"   It was years before he caught on. 

 

I agree with you on "journey" and similarly "emotional"

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, philheybrookbay said:

Realinement is the current buzz word in my job. 

 

Because restructure is far more scary according to bosses and they think we’re daft enough to fall for that crap. No it’s a restructure and some will loose their jobs.

 

Its as if these people think we fell out of the tree and bounced on every branch on the way down. 

 

Yep. Realignment is just a vaguely businessy minced oath for ‘shafting people’.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Boudicca said:

And anyone who goes on any sort of "journey", emotional , non drinking or spiritual. Go away.

 

 

Yes yes yes. A ‘journey’ or a ‘rollercoaster’. Cunto clichés.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Handrejka said:

 

I don't think it's as simple as North/South, I'm from the North and the midday meal has always been called lunch in my house. For the evening meal it would depend on whether we were having a full-on sit down meal in which case it was dinner or grabbing something quick before going out which would be tea.

 

When I was with my now ex I'd often ask " Are you going to make dinner tonight or shall I do tea?"   It was years before he caught on. 

 

I agree with you on "journey" and similarly "emotional"

That's what I mean, it's a minefield.

 

Dinner, supper and now you've brought tea into it but I had friends who had tea too. Everyone called it something different!

 

Dinner Ladies at school, looking back with a sense of class they now sound incredibly  grandiose as is they should be swishing around in 20 grand Versace dresses.

 

Lunchtime assistants they don't have the same ring although I know they absolutely incredible work,

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

unctuous

 

Sounds and looks ugly to me.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate the overuse of "awesome".

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Joey Russ said:

Phlegm. 

 

I have no idea why they have to call mucus something different just because it comes from a different place, but maybe it’s just me... 

I do like the one liner it spawned though:

 

I've been coughing up so much mucus that people think I'm Phlegmish.

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, deadsox said:

I do like the one liner it spawned though:

 

I've been coughing up so much mucus that people think I'm Phlegmish.

awesome

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, gcreptile said:

unctuous

 

Sounds and looks ugly to me.

lovely word that describes all the old blokes in my local who get a hard on when some woman under the age of 40 walks in. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, gcreptile said:

unctuous

 

Sounds and looks ugly to me.

 

That’s a charming word! In fact, most of its synonyms are pleasing words too: obsequious, sycophantic, oleaginous, all wholesome words that aren’t used enough.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Partner

Or more specifically the way this neutral word has been hijacked to mean 'the person with whom one is having a sexual relationship'.

Now we have to put up with ambiguity if we wish to speak of a business partner, dance partner or any non-sexual use of the word.

 

Conversely I think not enough use is made of delightul words like paramour and concubine.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding the meals terminology, as I've always understood it, "dinner" is the main meal of the day.  If you eat your main meal last as most people do, it's "breakfast, lunch and dinner".  If you eat your main meal in the middle, it's "breakfast, dinner and supper". 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Toast said:

Partner

Or more specifically the way this neutral word has been hijacked to mean 'the person with whom one is having a sexual relationship'.

I've always been suspicious of John Lewis Partners.... 

 

Also, off-topic but whilst I'm on about them "Never knowingly undersold"? Really? They must spend all the time not at work with a bag on their heads. They might have good customer service and a better than average attitude towards capitalism and treatment of staff (sorry, partners). But cheapest? Er no.

 

Oh, and back on topic and in the same vein. 'Significant other'. ugh. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That reminds me ...

 

"Colleague" when used to mean staff.  Sainsburys, I'm looking at you.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Toast said:

Partner

Or more specifically the way this neutral word has been hijacked to mean 'the person with whom one is having a sexual relationship'.

Now we have to put up with ambiguity if we wish to speak of a business partner, dance partner or any non-sexual use of the word.

 

Conversely I think not enough use is made of delightul words like paramour and concubine.

It would make party conversation so much more interesting:

 

"Have you met Sarah?  She's my concubine".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Toast said:

Partner

Or more specifically the way this neutral word has been hijacked to mean 'the person with whom one is having a sexual relationship'.

Now we have to put up with ambiguity if we wish to speak of a business partner, dance partner or any non-sexual use of the word.

 

Conversely I think not enough use is made of delightul words like paramour and concubine.

 

I love the word paramour. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kudos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, deadsox said:
17 hours ago, Joey Russ said:

Phlegm. 

 

I have no idea why they have to call mucus something different just because it comes from a different place, but maybe it’s just me... 

I do like the one liner it spawned though:

 

I've been coughing up so much mucus that people think I'm Phlegmish.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Boudicca said:

I had to google that. Seriously, what is wrong with people?

 

I fly 10-12  times a year and have never heard it.

 

Easyjet, defenders of plain English! 

 

B.A probably do it though, I've seen the sort of people who come along when their own cushy flights have been cancelled.

 

Apart from all the DL gentlemen travelers, who I am sure aren't loud, braying, LOOK AT ME, I'm SOOOO important, types of course :unsure:

Backpedaling2-e1394249934870.jpg

 

 

Is that a young Hasidic Jew in the background with arms crossed?? Must be near White Hart Lane....

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two words used together, but, I hate 'for free'; if you mean something has no charge attached then say 'free of charge'. It's not bloody difficult.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bookmarking this to remind me of words to use more often on here. B)

 

One word I hate is "worldie". As used by sports pundits to describe goals. In fact, the over use of the phrase "world class" in general.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yip. Harold Kane = World Class. 

 

Total misunderstanding of the phrase.

 

Same as Shearer.

 

Line acre was the last World Class striker they had  

 

But the media.........hypes it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

Your use of this forum is subject to our Terms of Use